"It is clear that the public school system is the place where African American children receive a significant portion of their view of the world and the history of the world.  And, it also is a place where large numbers of African in America youth are miseducated under the system of white supremacy through the ideas and interpretation of history that are presented to them."

African Centered Education

There are hundreds of books, miles of scholarly research, journal articles, academic reports, schools and websites discussing what African Centered Education is, and we dedicate this section of the website to feature many of those in the coming months.  Since our primary mission is to provide our parents of African American children with the most informed ideas on educational and cultural excellence, that knowledge begins with an insistence on the importance of learning about our cultural and ancestral origins so our children know the TRUTH of these contributions to humanity and how they relate to their own potential and greatness.  

 


 

African-Centered Education is based upon the research that all humans have their physical, social, and intellectual origins in Africa. The child is placed and grounded at “this center” and through an inclusionary process, all representative groups are placed, not above or below any group, but alongside the rest of humanity as events and truth dictates.


 

The initial introduction to African Centered Education below is from the writings of famed activist, Dr. Conrad Worrill, the retired Director and Professor at Northeastern Illinois University's Jacob H. Carruthers Center for Inner City Studies. (Learn more about Dr. Worrill, click on his image to the right).

A 2012 study published in The Journal of Child Development found “racial pride to be the most powerful factor in protecting children from the sting of discriminatory behavior." It directly and positively related to three out of four academic outcomes:

1. grade-point averages;

2. educational aspirations;

3. cognitive engagement;

4. and was also related to resilience

in the face of discrimination.

The movement to implement an appropriate African Centered Curriculum in predominately African in America inner city schools is critical to the on-going struggle for the liberation of African people in this country. We must continue to demand that the truth be taught as we continue to struggle to build the Reparations Movement in America.

This movement has now become popularly known as the African Centered Education Movement.

 

Simply stated, it focuses on TEACHING THE TRUTH concerning the contributions of African people to the development of civilization in all subjects.

 

We must heighten the dialogue concerning the importance of this move-ment, particularly as it relates to the question of reparations. Throughout the country, Africans in America are now becoming more sensitive to challenging the racist and white supremacist basis of the American public school curriculum.

From: PUBLIC SCHOOLS AND THE AFRICAN CENTERED CURRICULUM, the Chicago Crusader, Nov. 3, 2017

BLACK PRIDE MATTERS

Through the Portland Model Baseline Essays, the work of the Kemetic Institute, the Association for the Study of Classical African Civilizations (ASCAC), and other writings and curriculum materials, Africans are becoming much more aware of the following points that must be incorporated into the curriculum:

  1. Africa is the home of early man.

  2. Africa is the cradle of modern man.

  3. Africa is the cradle of civilization.

  4. Africa once held a position as world teacher including the teacher for the western world.

  5. There was and there still is a continental wide unity in Africa and in the African communities around the world.

  6. The first time Africans left the continent was not on slave ships.

  7. Africa and African people all over the world have been under siege for nearly 2,000 years and only recently by European slavery and colonization.

  8. There is an African Diaspora all over the world today.

  9. African people have resisted domination on the continent and all over the world.

  10. Even under slavery, colonization, segregation, apartheid, African people have made monumental contributions to arts, science and politics.

10 Points

These

and others, have become the basis upon which we can judge the white supremacy public school curriculum's content in textbooks and other learning materials.